Interview

  • by Roger Washington
    Artist: Tashi Brauen
    Artist: Tashi Brauen

    The works of Swiss artist Tashi Brauen are created amid genres.

    Between image and sculpture, surface and volume, as well as between different media of artistic expression, Brauen creates expansive installations, picturesque-looking photographs and relief-like wall objects that playfully trace the phenomenon of the surface.

    Through his material manipulation, Tashi Brauen opens up a new and unusual view of traditional materials and focuses on their physical properties.

     


     

  • by Roger Washington
    Artist: Tashi Brauen
    Artist: Tashi Brauen

    Die Arbeiten des Schweizer Künstlers Tashi Brauen sind im Dazwischen angelegt.

    Zwischen Bild und Skulptur, Fläche und Volumen, sowie zwischen verschiedenen Medien künstlerischen Ausdrucks, schafft Brauen raumgreifende Installationen, malerisch anmutende Fotografien und reliefartige Wandobjekte, die spielerisch dem Phänomen der Oberfläche nachspüren.

    Durch seine Materialmanipulationen eröffnet Tashi Brauen einen neuen und ungewöhnlichen Blick auf traditionelle Werkstoffe und rückt ihre physischen Eigenschaften in den Fokus.

     


     

  • by Roger Washington
    Artist: Patricia Sandonis
    Artist: Patricia Sandonis

    The works of Berlin based Spanish artist Patricia Sandonis possess a strong political character.

    The partly participatory installations, objects, and drawings translate social phenomena into artistic processes. For example, Sandonis deals with the creation and consolidation of collective memory. For this, she has dealt with the conservation of European monuments, and has developed her own artistic language of remembrance.

     


     

  • by Roger Washington
    Artist: Patricia Sandonis
    Artist: Patricia Sandonis

    Die Arbeiten der spanischen Künstlerin Patricia Sandonis, die in Berlin lebt und arbeitet, haben einen ausgeprägt politischen Charakter.

     

    Ihre zum Teil partizipativen Installationen, Objekte und Zeichnungen, übersetzen gesellschaftliche Phänomene in künstlerische Prozesse. So beschäftigt sich Sandonis beispielsweise mit der Entstehung und Festschreibung kollektiver Erinnerung. Hierfür hat sie sich mit Europäischer Denkmalkultur auseinandergesetzt und ihre eigene künstlerische Formensprache des Erinnerns entwickelt.

     


     

  • by Roger Washington
    Elisabeth Sonneck, Scrollpainting5 rotation orange, 2015, Kunstmuseum Ahlen, Germany, with a painting by Heinrich Campendonk, Oil on paper ea. 110 x 500 cm (Photo: Hubert Kemper)
    Elisabeth Sonneck, Scrollpainting5 rotation orange, 2015, Kunstmuseum Ahlen, Germany, with a painting by Heinrich Campendonk, Oil on paper ea. 110 x 500 cm (Photo: Hubert Kemper)

    The Berlin-based artist Elisabeth Sonneck uses painterly means to create exciting color spaces. However, these do not constitute a self-contained illusionistic image, but are directly related to their environment.

     

    In temporary site-specific installations as well as in autonomous pictorial objects, Elisabeth Sonneck's painting emanates from surface and wall, becomes vivid and conquers real space. With minimalist lightness, her works expand artistic boundaries.

     


     

  • by Roger Washington
    Elisabeth Sonneck, Scrollpainting5 rotation orange, 2015, Kunstmuseum Ahlen, Germany, with a painting by Heinrich Campendonk, Oil on paper ea. 110 x 500 cm (Photo: Hubert Kemper)
    Elisabeth Sonneck, Scrollpainting5 rotation orange, 2015, Kunstmuseum Ahlen, Germany, with a painting by Heinrich Campendonk, Oil on paper ea. 110 x 500 cm (Photo: Hubert Kemper)

    Die in Berlin lebende und arbeitende Künstlerin Elisabeth Sonneck schafft mit malerischen Mitteln spannungsvolle Farbräume. Diese stellen jedoch kein in sich abgeschlossenes illusionistisches Bildgeschehen dar, sondern stehen in direkter Relation zu ihrer Umgebung.

     

    In Form von ortsbezogenen Installationen und eigenständigen Bildobjekten emanzipiert sich Elisabeth Sonneck‘s Malerei von Fläche und Wand, wird plastisch und erobert den Realraum. Mit minimalistischer Leichtigkeit erweitern ihre Arbeiten so künstlerische Gattungsgrenzen.

     


     

     

     

  • Marie-Laure Bernadac by Marie-Laure Bernadac
    Photo credits: Annelies Strba — Location: Arcegnio, Monte Verita, Ticino, Switzerland
    Photo credits: Annelies Strba — Location: Arcegnio, Monte Verita, Ticino, Switzerland

    An Interview with Mireille Gros by Marie-Laure Bernadac - 2001

     

    Marie-Laure Bernadac: this color book carries the name of the exhibition “émergence“. It contains many different drawings that were compiled and pasted in its pages.

     

    Mireille Gros: I use them to prepare the exhibition, to develop my vocabulary of forms.

     

    MLB: some of the motifs are quite different from the plant and vegetable motifs so characteristic of your work. The compositions, too, are different. There are fewer single subjects, the pages are fuller, some even entirely covered with tiny cells.

     

    MG: A reduction took place. When you look through a microscope or a telescope you often see a similar picture. I don’t differentiate between abstract and figurative drawing. By changing my position and thereby my perspective, I’m freer. Near meets far.

     

     

     

     

  • Lisa Johnston by Lisa Johnston
    Rania Schoretsaniti, "Red Trikke", 2019 - Photo courtesy of Alexandros Chiras
    Rania Schoretsaniti, "Red Trikke", 2019 - Photo courtesy of Alexandros Chiras

    Rania Schoretsaniti is a Greek artist who draws on a rich cultural and artisanal heritage of craftsmanship, spirituality and family values. From a young age, she was taught the importance of self-sustainability, and her grandmother offered her valuable instruction on how to make things by hand. The core lesson being that in times of hardship you can draw on your strength and ‘use your hands and your head’ to make something of value and integrity in your life.


    As a child, Rania grew up playing in the workshop of her family’s furniture-making business, where she observed the mechanics of sofas being built from raw cuts of wood knocked together into frames before being clad by beautiful upholstered fabrics.

    Nostalgia for the purity of this time is deeply imbued in processes behind her works, which range from energetic, abstract oil on canvases, such as “Big Smile” or “Pink Sky”, to her finely rendered lines in ink and oil on canvas (like “Jacob’s Ladder” and “Synanteseis”).

     

    But it is in her reliefs that the physicality of “using her hands” really comes into fruition. Every part of the soaring forms behind her works such as “Silk 1”, “Sea” or her “Trikke” series are constructed by hand, starting with the wooden frames, which are covered in bright fabrics, many of which she hand-dyed using traditional techniques.

     

    Rania describes her works as her “words” which she uses to interpret and express a conscious and subconscious experience of the world, and which form a bridge to the divide between the known and the unknown (Heaven and Earth). Her symbolic use of lines and ladders are conversations that express the choice we have as humans to take steps “and build” so that we evolve from a position of suffering to one of empowerment or enlightenment.

  • Liz Elissa-Stuart by Liz Elissa-Stuart
    Image: Oksana Bergen seated in from of "Alive" (Red)
    Image: Oksana Bergen seated in from of "Alive" (Red)

    Oksana Bergen is a visual artist living and working in Germany. She was born and raised in the town of Kedrovy Shor, in Russia. At the age of 15, Oksana and her family moved to Paderborn, Germany, where she now lives with her husband and their two sons. 

     

    I had the pleasure of interviewing Oksana where I was captivated by watching live demonstrations of her agile and graceful hands snipping paper, while the fine paper “hair” floated gently onto the table. Oksana skillfully cuts and shapes design elements unifying them to achieve works of art.

     

    Ecologically minded, Oksana uses colored advertisement paper, choosing it for its malleability and stability for building her relief work. She collects unsolicited promotional print material most people would toss in the recycling bin. Instead of discarding it, she expertly manipulates this glossy, colored print material rendering it depth and elevating it to an aesthetic relief artwork. Oksana is like an alchemist of paper, transforming junk mail and imparting it with an aesthetic form, fundamentally turning “trash to treasure.” 

     

     

     

     

  • Christi Dufour by Christi Dufour
    Image: Tashi Brauen Photo credits: Jeremy Knowles
    Image: Tashi Brauen Photo credits: Jeremy Knowles

    Tashi Brauen is a Swiss-Tibetan photographer, painter, and sculptor based in Zurich, Switzerland. His work combines the fragility of paper, spontaneous folding and manipulating surfaces with bold color and texture to reveal the artist's affection for geometric forms, shifting perspectives on dimension and exploring the interplay of scale, impact and details.

     

    Meeting Tashi for the first time at his exhibition in Bern at the Museum of Fine Arts, our easy conversation led the way to a recent visit at his studio in central Zurich. There, we discussed his upcoming exhibition in Berlin at Ronewa Art Projects, his work and process as well as sharing a personal glimpse of his life as an artist.

  • Image: Veit Schmidleitner Image credits: Jeremy Knowles
    Image: Veit Schmidleitner Image credits: Jeremy Knowles

     

    Veit Schmidleitner 

     

    German artist Veit Schmidleitner's paintings from his "Coupure" Series of abstractions fuse a sense of the industrial with inherent elegance that create new surfaces that defy tradition. These sometimes dramatically contrasting notions are brought together in compositions that evoke both a new visual topography and a sense of grace that nod to industrial roots, but that in some ways deflect traditional artistic methods.

     

    The works range in scale from moderate to those that anchor an entire gallery wall, and as the spacious galleries include natural light at certain times of the day, many nuances and visual textures are revealed to the delight of the viewer.

     

    At first glance, compositions appear to feature a traditional paint application of washes that harbor the subtlety of watercolor work, but there is more. A variety of color tones and greys that shift and evolve of their own accord take over the compositions. In some areas, there are bursts of intense color that grab the eye and interrupt initial readings. Simultaneously, curiosity is piqued as these works have what appear to be a mix of traditional and industrial pigments, and high-gloss varnish that gives the work an extreme polish or sheen that is intriguing. The treatment of surface is reflective and as the viewer approaches the work they may see their reflection and elements in their space. This is not a classic painting approach, it is something very new indeed.

     

    Schmidleitner creates with cut panels that are often times irregular, but that are joined to make finished stable rectangular or near-square compositions. Orientations may be primarily vertical or horizontal depending on the piece.

     

    I had the opportunity recently to speak with Schmidleitner by Skype and also in person in Berlin, before the vernissage.