Works on paper

  • Tashi Brauen, "Rissprotokoll VII", 2019
    Tashi Brauen, "Rissprotokoll VII", 2019

    ENGLISH TRANSLATION

     

    Exhibition:

    26 October 2019 - 12 December 2019 

     

    Tashi Brauen’s objects and pictures aren’t meant for all eternity. Back in the studio from an exhibition, cardboard might get a second coat of paint. Then the previous shade might announce itself on the surface in soft shadows, or mix itself with the temperature of the new layer of acrylic. Tashi Brauen delights in materials and enjoys a nearly intimate relationship with paper. He tests its narrative potential by treating it with paint or damaging it just slightly. A crease, split or tear draws light, irregular veins into the red or blue ground. Cardboard jumps off the wall three times, forms half drums and, with cracked edges, evokes a notion of columns, lanterns, lampshades. And that’s where it happens: painting flirting with design and delivering a commentary on the environment and architecture. A piece of paper glued to the surface becomes a threshold, its micro-edge casts a dark, narrow shadow onto a monochrome surface. Doesn’t a landscape have its beginnings in such a minimal gradation?

  • Roger Washington by Roger Washington
    Artist: Tashi Brauen
    Artist: Tashi Brauen

    The works of Swiss artist Tashi Brauen are created amid genres.

    Between image and sculpture, surface and volume, as well as between different media of artistic expression, Brauen creates expansive installations, picturesque-looking photographs and relief-like wall objects that playfully trace the phenomenon of the surface.

    Through his material manipulation, Tashi Brauen opens up a new and unusual view of traditional materials and focuses on their physical properties.

     


     

  • Roger Washington by Roger Washington
    Artist: Patricia Sandonis
    Artist: Patricia Sandonis

    The works of Berlin based Spanish artist Patricia Sandonis possess a strong political character.

    The partly participatory installations, objects, and drawings translate social phenomena into artistic processes. For example, Sandonis deals with the creation and consolidation of collective memory. For this, she has dealt with the conservation of European monuments, and has developed her own artistic language of remembrance.

     


     

  • Roger Washington by Roger Washington
    Elisabeth Sonneck, Scrollpainting5 rotation orange, 2015, Kunstmuseum Ahlen, Germany, with a painting by Heinrich Campendonk, Oil on paper ea. 110 x 500 cm (Photo: Hubert Kemper)
    Elisabeth Sonneck, Scrollpainting5 rotation orange, 2015, Kunstmuseum Ahlen, Germany, with a painting by Heinrich Campendonk, Oil on paper ea. 110 x 500 cm (Photo: Hubert Kemper)

    The Berlin-based artist Elisabeth Sonneck uses painterly means to create exciting color spaces. However, these do not constitute a self-contained illusionistic image, but are directly related to their environment.

     

    In temporary site-specific installations as well as in autonomous pictorial objects, Elisabeth Sonneck's painting emanates from surface and wall, becomes vivid and conquers real space. With minimalist lightness, her works expand artistic boundaries.

     


     

  • Marie-Laure Bernadac by Marie-Laure Bernadac
    Photo credits: Annelies Strba — Location: Arcegnio, Monte Verita, Ticino, Switzerland
    Photo credits: Annelies Strba — Location: Arcegnio, Monte Verita, Ticino, Switzerland

    An Interview with Mireille Gros by Marie-Laure Bernadac - 2001

     

    Marie-Laure Bernadac: this color book carries the name of the exhibition “émergence“. It contains many different drawings that were compiled and pasted in its pages.

     

    Mireille Gros: I use them to prepare the exhibition, to develop my vocabulary of forms.

     

    MLB: some of the motifs are quite different from the plant and vegetable motifs so characteristic of your work. The compositions, too, are different. There are fewer single subjects, the pages are fuller, some even entirely covered with tiny cells.

     

    MG: A reduction took place. When you look through a microscope or a telescope you often see a similar picture. I don’t differentiate between abstract and figurative drawing. By changing my position and thereby my perspective, I’m freer. Near meets far.

     

     

     

     

  • Liz Elissa-Stuart by Liz Elissa-Stuart
    Image: Oksana Bergen seated in from of "Alive" (Red)
    Image: Oksana Bergen seated in from of "Alive" (Red)

    Oksana Bergen is a visual artist living and working in Germany. She was born and raised in the town of Kedrovy Shor, in Russia. At the age of 15, Oksana and her family moved to Paderborn, Germany, where she now lives with her husband and their two sons. 

     

    I had the pleasure of interviewing Oksana where I was captivated by watching live demonstrations of her agile and graceful hands snipping paper, while the fine paper “hair” floated gently onto the table. Oksana skillfully cuts and shapes design elements unifying them to achieve works of art.

     

    Ecologically minded, Oksana uses colored advertisement paper, choosing it for its malleability and stability for building her relief work. She collects unsolicited promotional print material most people would toss in the recycling bin. Instead of discarding it, she expertly manipulates this glossy, colored print material rendering it depth and elevating it to an aesthetic relief artwork. Oksana is like an alchemist of paper, transforming junk mail and imparting it with an aesthetic form, fundamentally turning “trash to treasure.” 

     

     

     

     

  • Christi Dufour by Christi Dufour
    Image: Tashi Brauen Photo credits: Jeremy Knowles
    Image: Tashi Brauen Photo credits: Jeremy Knowles

    Tashi Brauen is a Swiss-Tibetan photographer, painter, and sculptor based in Zurich, Switzerland. His work combines the fragility of paper, spontaneous folding and manipulating surfaces with bold color and texture to reveal the artist's affection for geometric forms, shifting perspectives on dimension and exploring the interplay of scale, impact and details.

     

    Meeting Tashi for the first time at his exhibition in Bern at the Museum of Fine Arts, our easy conversation led the way to a recent visit at his studio in central Zurich. There, we discussed his upcoming exhibition in Berlin at Ronewa Art Projects, his work and process as well as sharing a personal glimpse of his life as an artist.