Relief sculpture

  • April Dell by April Dell
    Marinda Vandenheede in her studio, Waregem, Belgium.
    Marinda Vandenheede in her studio, Waregem, Belgium.

    Marinda Vandenheede’s new series Oxygen continues her use of curious found objects combined with her own geometric formal language. For this series, she repurposes cardboard punched card patterns used in industrial loom weaving, overlaying them with hand-painted geometric designs guided by a minimalist logic of repetition and symmetry.

    Vandenheede's Oxygen series will be featured in the Ronewa online viewing room from June 1 to July 1, 2022. We chatted to Vandenheede about balancing abstract compositions with found objects, and the histories and complexities inherent within the materials themselves. 

     

    Read the exhibition press release here.

  • April Dell by April Dell
    Artist Marinda Vandenheede in her studio
    Photo: Marinda Vandenheede

    Marinda Vandenheede repurposes found objects marked by use and time to create quietly enchanting sculptural objects and paper works that spark curiosity and wonder. Her exhibition ‘Re:Generations’ opens in the Ronewa online viewing room on March 3, 2021. 

     

    Vandenheede juxtaposes unique signs of a past life and the natural degradation of materials with geometric forms and surprising compositions. Her playful works nod to the inherent dualities found within humanity and nature, and invite viewers to see the beauty in decay.

     

    We talked to Vandenheede about her relationship to her chosen materials and objects, the conceptual balance she strikes in her compositions, and the moment of stillness she offers her viewers.

  • April Dell by April Dell
    Elisabeth Sonneck installing a scrollpainting. Photo: Yang Rui
    Elisabeth Sonneck installing a scrollpainting. Photo: Yang Rui

    The upcoming online exhibition ‘Ritardando - In Color’ by Berlin-based artist Elisabeth Sonneck features works that continue her exploration into the physical relations of form and color in space. 

     

    Ritardando is a musical term meaning a gradual decrease in speed. This sense of slowing down describes Sonneck’s rhythmic repetition of broad and steady brushstrokes that allow nuances of color variations and interactions to play out on paper and canvas surfaces. These surfaces are gently manipulated into dynamic shapes that form a dialogue between the intrinsic properties of her everyday materials and situational elements of space, light, environment, and audience. Read the press release here.

     

    We talked to Sonneck about her process, her love of paper, and the spatial relationships that make each installation of her works unique. 

  • Roger Washington by Roger Washington
    Elisabeth Sonneck, Scrollpainting5 rotation orange, 2015, Kunstmuseum Ahlen, Germany, with a painting by Heinrich Campendonk, Oil on paper ea. 110 x 500 cm. Photo: Hubert Kemper
    Elisabeth Sonneck, Scrollpainting5 rotation orange, 2015, Kunstmuseum Ahlen, Germany, with a painting by Heinrich Campendonk, Oil on paper ea. 110 x 500 cm. Photo: Hubert Kemper

    The Berlin-based artist Elisabeth Sonneck uses painterly means to create exciting color spaces. However, these do not constitute a self-contained illusionistic image, but are directly related to their environment.

     

    In temporary site-specific installations as well as in autonomous pictorial objects, Elisabeth Sonneck's painting emanates from surface and wall, becomes vivid and conquers real space. With minimalist lightness, her works expand artistic boundaries.

     


     

  • Image: Tashi Brauen Photo credits: Jeremy Knowles (Courtesy: Ronewa Art Projects)
    Image: Tashi Brauen Photo credits: Jeremy Knowles (Courtesy: Ronewa Art Projects)

    Tashi Brauen is a Swiss-Tibetan photographer, painter, and sculptor based in Zurich, Switzerland. His work combines the fragility of paper, spontaneous folding and manipulating surfaces with bold color and texture to reveal the artist's affection for geometric forms, shifting perspectives on dimension and exploring the interplay of scale, impact and details.

     

    Meeting Tashi for the first time at his exhibition in Bern at the Museum of Fine Arts, our easy conversation led the way to a recent visit at his studio in central Zurich. There, we discussed his upcoming exhibition in Berlin at Ronewa Art Projects, his work and process as well as sharing a personal glimpse of his life as an artist.