Painting

  • April Dell by April Dell
    Michele Colburn in her Washington, DC, studio. Photo: Lee Stalsworth
    Michele Colburn in her Washington, DC, studio. Photo: Lee Stalsworth

    The upcoming online exhibition ‘In Plain Sight’ with American-Swiss artist Michele Colburn presents recent works from her stirring abstract series of gunpowder paintings. Read the press release here.

     

    Colburn employs symbolically loaded materials connected to violence and war. Through her process, she disarms the explosive substance and creates beautiful and poignant works that invite reflection on violent histories and current realities. The works soon on exhibit in the Ronewa viewing room were all created in 2020, many under Covid lockdown conditions in Washington, DC.

     

    We caught up with Ms. Colburn and discussed her use of symbolic materials, her gunpowder painting process, and the personal and political contexts of her work. Our conversation took place just a day before the shocking events on January 6th in Washington, DC, and her works feel more relevant now than ever.

  • April Dell by April Dell
    Elisabeth Sonneck installing a scrollpainting. Photo: Yang Rui
    Elisabeth Sonneck installing a scrollpainting. Photo: Yang Rui

    The upcoming online exhibition ‘Ritardando - In Color’ by Berlin-based artist Elisabeth Sonneck features works that continue her exploration into the physical relations of form and color in space. 

     

    Ritardando is a musical term meaning a gradual decrease in speed. This sense of slowing down describes Sonneck’s rhythmic repetition of broad and steady brushstrokes that allow nuances of color variations and interactions to play out on paper and canvas surfaces. These surfaces are gently manipulated into dynamic shapes that form a dialogue between the intrinsic properties of her everyday materials and situational elements of space, light, environment, and audience. Read the press release here.

     

    We talked to Sonneck about her process, her love of paper, and the spatial relationships that make each installation of her works unique. 

  • April Dell by April Dell
    Rico Lascano in his studio. Photo by Nap Jamir.
    Rico Lascano in his studio. Photo by Nap Jamir.

    Rico Lascano's upcoming exhibition in the Ronewa Online Viewing Room opens on September 3rd. We talked to him about his meditative art practice, nature and spirituality, and making art during lockdown.

     

    Lascano's abstract practice draws from the breathtaking nature in the Philippines, the spiritual traditions of his home country, and his own quest for serenity and peace in a busy world. Within his floating compositions and delicately textured expanses, Lascano creates boundless spaces of stillness and timelessness. He invites viewers to occupy the transcendantal space of his inner journey.

  • April Dell by April Dell
    Tashi Brauen, photo by Claude Gasser
    Tashi Brauen, photo by Claude Gasser

    Opening to the public on June 19th, 2020, is Ronewa Art Projects’ first online exhibition—the beginning of a new era of online art. Swiss artist Tashi Brauen presents a new series of works born out of the COVID-19 pandemic lockdown. We talk to Brauen about his new works and the online art world.

  • Roger Washington by Roger Washington
    Artist: Tashi Brauen
    Artist: Tashi Brauen

    The works of Swiss artist Tashi Brauen are created amid genres.

    Between image and sculpture, surface and volume, as well as between different media of artistic expression, Brauen creates expansive installations, picturesque-looking photographs and relief-like wall objects that playfully trace the phenomenon of the surface.

    Through his material manipulation, Tashi Brauen opens up a new and unusual view of traditional materials and focuses on their physical properties.

     


     

  • Roger Washington by Roger Washington
    Artist: Patricia Sandonis
    Artist: Patricia Sandonis

    The works of Berlin based Spanish artist Patricia Sandonis possess a strong political character.

    The partly participatory installations, objects, and drawings translate social phenomena into artistic processes. For example, Sandonis deals with the creation and consolidation of collective memory. For this, she has dealt with the conservation of European monuments, and has developed her own artistic language of remembrance.

     


     

  • Roger Washington by Roger Washington
    Elisabeth Sonneck, Scrollpainting5 rotation orange, 2015, Kunstmuseum Ahlen, Germany, with a painting by Heinrich Campendonk, Oil on paper ea. 110 x 500 cm. Photo: Hubert Kemper
    Elisabeth Sonneck, Scrollpainting5 rotation orange, 2015, Kunstmuseum Ahlen, Germany, with a painting by Heinrich Campendonk, Oil on paper ea. 110 x 500 cm. Photo: Hubert Kemper

    The Berlin-based artist Elisabeth Sonneck uses painterly means to create exciting color spaces. However, these do not constitute a self-contained illusionistic image, but are directly related to their environment.

     

    In temporary site-specific installations as well as in autonomous pictorial objects, Elisabeth Sonneck's painting emanates from surface and wall, becomes vivid and conquers real space. With minimalist lightness, her works expand artistic boundaries.